Monday, 15 August 2016

Olympic Efforts

You might not feel like an Olympian, as you sit at your desk writing away, but we do share some similarities with our more energetic athletic compatriots. (Admittedly, as far as it goes with me, those similarities do not include the athletic body shape.)

The athletes are all focussed on a specific goal. They’re in training, every day, to become better at their craft and to improve their skills. They use psychology to help them focus and picture their dreams. (I loved the Jack Laugher and Chris Mears tactic of having a blank photo frame above the fireplace in preparation for the photo of them receiving their gold medals - flipping well worked, didn’t it?) They’re competing against others. Some sports have to go through several heats in order to reach their goal. When they win gold they are the happiest people on the planet. But when they lose it’s as though the last four years have been a waste of time. (They haven’t, but that’s what some say it feels like.)

We writers go through something similar. Many of us have a specific goal in mind we’re aiming for: a published short story, article, or even a book. If we can write every day, no matter how few those words may be, we’ll become better at our craft. We know that psychology can help us achieve our dreams (picturing our novels on the shelves at bookshops, or our articles in a magazine on the newsagents’ shelf). We’re competing against other writers: there’s only so many slots in a magazine in each issue, so many new authors agents will take on, so many books a publisher will publish in a year. And sometimes those successes have to be fought for one at a time. The first heat a novelist has to win is to finish the novel. The next few heats is to get it edited. The penultimate heat might be securing an agent. And then the final heat is to secure a publisher. 

And when publication happens, it’s the best feeling in the world. And yet rejection … well. We all know what rejection feels like. But then, that is what makes Gold so special.

So next time you think of yourself as ‘just’ a writer, think again. You have a lot more in common with Olympic athletes than you might think. 

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to refuel my body with the energy it needs to keep me in this tip-top athletic condition: tea, and chocolate hob nobs. ;-)


Good luck. 

4 comments:

  1. The dedication of the Olympians, the single-mindedness that success requires, is most definitely something that should inspire all of us. I just wish last night’s tennis match had finished an hour or two earlier. I am now aiming for Gold in the coffee-drinking final.

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  2. Their dedication and constant pushing towards being the best athletes they can is phenomenal. I agree we can learn so much from them.

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  3. Their dedication and constant pushing towards being the best athletes they can is phenomenal. I agree we can learn so much from them.

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